Installing Reverse Osmosis System in Basement


You never know how pure the water in your home is, even if it’s pre-filtered from the tank.

You should get a great water filtration system in your home, but you can’t just get a random water filter. Water purified through generic or traditional filters can still get dirty from rusty pipes and old filters.

Additionally, traditional filters can only purify water to a certain extent; you’ll be surprised how many contaminants are still in the water after running through a conventional filter.

Since you can’t risk getting a general filter, the ideal filter for your home is a Reverse Osmosis (RO) Filter. An RO filter will get the job done better than you think; an RO filter purifies and removes up to 99% of contaminants, which is higher than any filter can achieve.

That any filter under the sink can be troublesome to handle for older people, people with back problems, and people with disabilities. 1

Where is the best place to install a Reverse Osmosis system?

Depending on the company/brand, Reverse Osmosis filters can take up space, so fitting them in the kitchen won’t do. Naturally, you’ll consider installing a reverse osmosis system in the basement.

This brings the question: can you install a reverse osmosis system in a basement?

Can You Install a Reverse Osmosis System in a Basement?

Luckily for you, yes, you can install a reverse osmosis system in a basement and even do it yourself.

Can You Install a Reverse Osmosis System in a Basement?

Installing a reverse osmosis system is not difficult, but you usually have to be smart about where you’re putting it.

Usually, reverse osmosis water filters go under the sink, but filters under the sink can be a hassle to maintain for various reasons. A significant reason is that any filter under the sink can be troublesome to handle for older people, people with back problems, and people with disabilities. This is why installing a water filter in the basement is recommended, even if it is a traditional model.

“Can I put an RO system in the basement?” If you’re asking this question, we can tell you the answer is yes. Installing a reverse osmosis system in the basement is possible, but it takes a little more than just an affirmative answer.

To install an RO system in your basement, you need to check with your RO system’s model and brand. Don’t worry: most brands offer RO systems that you can easily mount in the basement, so you’re good to go.

Can I Install a Reverse Osmosis System Myself in the Basement?

Installing a reverse osmosis system in the basement is easy, and you can even do it yourself. You heard it right; you can install a reverse osmosis system without calling a plumber or technician.

Related: How To Install Reverse Osmosis System Under Kitchen Sink?

Of course, if you have never installed a generic or RO water filter system yourself before, you may not know how to proceed with self-installation. It might also be the first time you’re buying an RO system, which will unfold many questions.

But don’t worry, because after reading this, you’ll know all the dos and don’ts of RV water filters and self-installations.

Are All RO Systems Compatible with Self-installation?

While every company’s reverse osmosis system differs from each other, you can install an RO system yourself, no matter where you get it. Yes, you can easily install any RO system in your basement until or unless you go with a company that recommends otherwise.

Most of the time, a reverse osmosis system is easy to install by yourself; this is thanks to newer models using simpler designs, making installation a quick and easy process.

The only case where you can’t install an RO system by yourself is if you get a whole house reverse osmosis system. A whole house RO system is complex and massive, so you need a trained set of hands for the installation.

On the other hand, aPoint-of-Use (PoU) RO system is usually installed under the sink or beside the faucet. However, most companies manufacture RO systems that are both PoU and basement-installation friendly.

So, for a basement water filter system, you want to install yourself, ensure you’re getting a model that isn’t solely PoU and isn’t a whole house RO system.

How to Install a Reverse Osmosis System in a Basement: Step-by-Step Guide

Luckily for beginners, installing a reverse osmosis system in a basement requires specific tools and basic plumbing skills. If you have no clue what you’re doing, you can always ask a friend to help. Installing most RO systems–even with different functions–is a straightforward process.

Required Tools

You can always consult the manual that comes with your RO system, but there are some tools you may need, including a screwdriver, tape measure, wrench, and pipe-seal tape.

Things to Know about Self-Installing an RO System in the Basement:

Can you install a reverse osmosis system in the basement? Yes, but there are some things you need to know before you do it.

Firstly, depending on your RO, you might need to invest in a booster pump. A booster pump or a pressure tank handles pressure changes in the water when it moves from the main tank through the filter to different areas of the house.

Secondly, you must not place the water filter somewhere freezing. An RO water filter in basement can’t handle severe temperature changes, so you must find a cozy spot with plenty of space.

Step-by-Step Self-installation of an RO System in the Basement

The first thing you’ll need to do is mount the unit on the wall. Mounting the unit is simple as it only involves screwing them in place. You then have to screw on the canisters (which have the filters inside them) on each top of the unit.

With most RO water systems, you’ll have a filter wrench that can tighten the canisters. Don’t tighten the canisters too much; a simple twist with the wrench will do.

Now, on the top of the main unit is a cylinder within which the filtering membrane lies. Unscrewing the cylinder is a little tricky; there are connected hoses with colored clips. Take out the clip (hold onto it) and push down to release the cylinder’s lid. Then place the RO membrane inside and close the lid. 

Connect the drain hose/pipe to an inlet at the back of the main unit. The other end of the hose will connect to a collector/saddle. Connect the additional (marked) hose to the other inlet.

Lastly, connect the third hose to the main water source. And you’re done.

Note: All water filter parts will be marked, so you won’t have to worry about confusing the hoses or not knowing where which part goes. The brand will also provide a manual for reference.

How Much Does It Cost to Have a Reverse Osmosis System Installed in a Basement?

Installing a reverse osmosis system is a bit pricier than a regular filter, but it’s definitely worth the money. In general, depending on various factors, you’re up for a $1500-$2500 cost. Let’s break it down.

Price of a Reverse Osmosis Filtration System

A complete RO system can cost you between $250-$400, depending on what brand you get. You will also have to pay a different amount if you get a PoU RO or a single-tap RO system.

RO System Installation Price

Installing a reverse osmosis system in the basement can rack up a few dollars, or it can be free. If you’re installing it yourself or a friend/relative is helping you out, you’re obviously saving the money.

However, if you’re hiring a plumber to do it for you, which we recommend for beginners, you are looking at an expenditure of $150-$250.

RO System Maintenance Price

RO systems don’t need much maintenance; a check once or twice a year will do. These checks (if done by a professional) won’t cost more than $200. However, if you ever need to repair broken or damaged components of your RO water system, you might have to pay around $300-$500 per component.

Is Basement the Best Place to Install a Reverse Osmosis System?

Getting a reverse osmosis system rather than a general/traditional filter is a good decision, but is installing a reverse osmosis system in a basement ideal? Sure, a basement water filter system has perks, but is it worth it? There are many advantages to having a water filter in a basement, but there are also some disadvantages.

Pros of Installing a Reverse Osmosis System in a Basement

  • Installing a water filter in the basement is ideal for those who find it difficult to bend and handle an under-the-sink RO system
  • An RO system in the basement is easier to maintain because you have a lot of space on hand and won’t have to work in a cramped space

Cons of Installing a Reverse Osmosis System in a Basement

  • You’ll have to travel down to the basement every time to check the RO system, which can be tiresome for most people
  • RO systems in basements are prone to extreme temperature changes, especially the cold. Since ROs shouldn’t be placed in freezing temperatures, figuring out a way to ward off the chilly weather is tricky and often not possible
  • Purified water from RO systems takes longer to reach the faucet as compared to PoU RO water systems
Installing Reverse Osmosis System in Basement

Things to Remember | Installing Reverse Osmosis System in Basement

  • A reverse osmosis system costs more than a conventional filter, but is worth every penny
  • Reverse osmosis systems can be installed either under the kitchen sink, near the main faucet or in the basement
  • A reverse osmosis system can cost around $1500-$2500, including maintenance and installation charges
  • Installing a reverse osmosis system by yourself is easy, but if you don’t have much experience, consult a professional
  • An RO filter installed in the basement is ideal for people who can’t bend down under the sink
  • You must not place an RO system in freezing or scorching temperatures

Edvinas

This is my blog about the ways and solutions that can help you improve your health by taking more value from drinking water. As improving health means a lot to me, I decided to create the Water On Top project with the purpose to reveal the benefits of water, the finest products to take our daily water to another level, and much more great stuff about water that I believe is on top of our nutrition.

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